Doctors Without Borders Fighting Cholera in Yemen

Doctors Without Borders pic
Doctors Without Borders
Image: doctorswithoutborders.org

Currently residing in New Jersey, Rao Chalasani has worked with several top New York, NY, financial companies throughout his accomplished career. Most recently, he served as the chief technology officer and risk strategist for Merrill Lynch. Outside of his work in the risk management field, Rao Chalasani supports several different charitable organizations, including Doctors Without Borders (MSF).

A recent outbreak of cholera in Yemen has Doctors Without Borders (MSF) calling for immediate aid to the region. According to MSF, the disease is spreading at a rampant pace and has the potential to propagate to uncontrollable proportions. Over a two-month period, the organization treated more than 12,000 cases of cholera, with the rate doubling over a five-day period near the end of May.

A lack of proper sanitation services, unclean drinking water, and continuing conflict destabilizing the region are the prime contributors to the spread of cholera in the area. Malnourished adults and children are at an elevated risk for contracting the illness, which is compounded by their lack of access to adequate health care. That’s why MSF is calling on relief organizations to send immediate aid to the area to help combat the spread of cholera to further, outlying areas.

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Doctors Without Borders Calls for Help with Cholera Outbreak in Yemen

Doctors Without Borders pic
Doctors Without Borders
Image: doctorswithoutborders.org

A resident of Livingston, New Jersey, Rao Chalasani has held various executive roles in the technology field, including working at a number of major financial firms in New York, NY. A committed philanthropist, Rao Chalasani supports a number of relief and medical organizations, including Doctors Without Borders.

According to a May 2017 press release from Doctors Without Borders, the cholera epidemic in Yemen has become a full-blown humanitarian crisis. Over a period of several weeks this spring, those who reported infections increased by a substantial margin. The organization has responded by setting up treatment centers at the five major medical facilities that are still operating in the country. Most of the hospitals have shut down, however, because of ongoing fighting.

With casualties from the war continuing to mount, Doctors Without Borders says that existing hospital facilities are ill-equipped to handle the increased amount of cholera infections occurring in the country. The organization is calling upon other relief and humanitarian organizations to provide resources for more treatment centers to curb the epidemic and provide care to those who desperately need it.