The Chase Leadership Development Program

Chase Leadership Development Program pic
Chase Leadership Development Program
Image: chase.com

A senior technology executive and financial services professional with over two decades of experience, Rao Chalasani has worked for a number of New York firms. Rao Chalasani received an opportunity to kickstart his career shortly after finishing college through an offer by JP Morgan Chase to participate in their Chase Leadership Development Program.

Participants in the program become acquainted with the Chase business and its products and services, while receiving mentorship through a series of rotations that last between 10 weeks and 24 months, depending on full-time or summer position. Throughout the program, participants receive on-the-job experience and engage in a variety of meaningful company projects. Project participation will also enable to them to gain experience in identifying new business opportunities and enhancing frameworks for risk and control.

The Chase Leadership Development Program is offered to college students and graduates with a minimum grade-point average of 3.2 who demonstrate strong leadership, problem-solving, and project management skills. General qualifications also include a commitment towards learning and customer satisfaction. Additionally, applicants must meet the specific requirements of the track they plan to apply for, which includes either enrollment or completion with a corresponding bachelor-level degree program. The program offers three track areas: risk management, analytics, and marketing and product development.

The Role of CTOs

Rao Chalasani has built his career on a foundation of technology and development risk management strategies. A resident of New Jersey, he has worked at mega corporations in New York, NY, such as Bank of America (BofA), JPMorgan Chase, and Merrill Lynch. At Merrill Lynch, Rao Chalasani served as risk management strategist and chief technology officer (CTO).

On the surface, the role of a CTO seems simple: choose and implement technologies that facilitate success for a company. Below the surface, however, the specifics run a gamut of responsibilities. A CTO may be able to choose a third-party solution for the company, such as a database program to keep track of customer accounts and inventory. When such solutions do not exist, or when existing solutions do not provide the functionality the company needs, CTOs must lead the research and development (R&D) of a proprietary solution. In either case, CTOs need to adhere to standards and regulations.

CTOs must also be aware of tech trends and news that could affect the company’s bottom line. Toward that end, CTOs must monitor and evaluate emerging technology in order to determine if it should be brought into the fold, or passed over in favor of other products. CTOs communicate their decisions to their managers, as well as to partners, investors, and employees.